// --> */ //]]> All-New Bundesliga & Premier League Sleeve Sponsors - Here Are The Best & Worst Ones - Footy Headlines

All-New Bundesliga & Premier League Sleeve Sponsors - Here Are The Best & Worst Ones

Both the German Bundesliga and the English Premier League are allowing all clubs to sign individual sleeve sponsorship deals from the 2017-18 season. Most teams had not many experiences with individual sleeve sponsors, and therefore the readability and the look of various sleeve advertisers is anything but perfect. We take a look at the best and worst examples of how to put a logo on the sleeves to generate a maximized advertising impact.



The sleeve logos in the Premier League can be a maximum of 100cm2, which is larger than what is possible in the Bundesliga.

2017-2018 Sleeve Sponsorship Logo Designs - Bad Ones



There are various examples of hardly readable and bad looking sponsor logos, especially in the German Bundesliga. The logos on the sleeves of teams such as RB Leipzig (CG Gruppe), Eintracht Frankfurt (Deutsche Börse) and FC Augsburg (Baramundi) could be much better readable, while Bayer Leverkusen's sleeve logo of the "Westminster-Unternehmensgruppe" is possibly the worst sleeve sponsor example in terms of readability (They receive 500,000 Euro / season for the deal).



Bundesliga teams also have the most outrageous logos on their sleeves, with Hertha BSC having the logo of 1 Euro store TEDi on the sleeves of their 85 Euro Nike kits.



Chelsea's Alliance Tyres, Leicester's SCB and Swansea's Barracuda are examples of rather bad looking / hardly readable sleeve sponsorships.


2017-2018 Sleeve Sponsorship Logo Design - Good Ones



Logically, many teams also managed to have good looking and easily visible sleeve sponsors, with Liverpool's Western Union, Manchester City's Nexen Tyres and Dortmund's Opel among the best looking / readable ones.



Another great example of how a sleeve sponsor can gain much attention just with the logo on the sleeves is UPS, Wolfsburg's new sleeve sponsor.

However, it is also important to note that the placement and look of the sleeve sponsorship logo is only the first task for advertisers and clubs, while the more difficult and equally important challenge is to 'activate' the sponsorship deal on social media and other platforms such as advertising LED panels. It is, however, safe to assume that there is a relation between the look of the logo on the sleeves and the attention a sleeve sponsor gets.


What do you think of this? Do you know other examples of nearly unreadable sponsor logos? Let us know in the comments below.